The Keefe Group Raises Questions Which Might Not Have Answers

Every now and then I like to just sit down and see what’s going on in the world. Like most people with a bit of curiosity, that means I sit down to read the Internet. But unlike most people, and even unlike my normal routine, today I sat down to read about the prison industry. It hadn’t started out that way. I’d actually been looking for ideas about healthy eating.

 

But what I found was a man talking about his sad fate of being forced away from healthy eating. It was a worrisome enough prospect when I thought that just voting for statewide prison edicts might change things. But the issue looks to be a lot deeper than the prisons themselves. It’s actually a threaded journey into a company called the Keefe Group. The prisoner reports that most of his issues actually come from that company. And this is where things begin to get a little more confusing.

 

The Keefe Group isn’t technically related to prisons at all. This is also part of the problem. If the Keefe Group was an official part of the prison system than they’d be held up to higher standards. But prisons have the ability to contract out services to 3rd party companies if they feel the need to. The intent is obviously good. It’s a provision put in place to ensure that prisoner’s needs are met. But the end result isn’t so good. It’s ensuring that the prison system can essentially leapfrog over nutritional standards. There’s also ethical issues involved when one considers that prisons are sometimes able to even profit from it. Prisons, obviously, are not meant to be a for profit institution built on prisoner suffering.

 

The issue here is that there’s no obvious solutions. Everything is legal, and there’s not a huge chance of the public suddenly demanding huge changes. I only lucked into finding out about it. And the public at large can’t be expected to look into what’s essentially a rather depressing situation. The main hope is that prisons decide enough is enough and increase the standards for their contracts. This at least has some chance of forcing the Keefe Group into better performance.