Global Tel-Link and the Dirty Kickbacks That Jails and Prisons Request

When it comes to discussions about inmates, some people have very harsh, black-and-white, staunch views. Some people may feel that inmates don’t deserve rights and that they should be in unpleasant conditions. However, inmates actually do have rights. Of course, they are entitled to serve time–and they should, but they are still human beings with civil rights. Also, their families and friends have civil rights, as well. Read more reviews on Glass Door to know more.

Unfortunately, companies like Global Tel-Link infringe upon the civil rights of inmates and their families by price gouging their phone calls. Inmates and loved ones are held between a rock and a hard place, because in order to contact each other, they must pay enormous fees and rates to Global Tel-Link.

Global Tel-Link is not the only inmate phone company in the United State of America—there are many others. However, Global Tel-Link is definitely one of the telephone companies that receives that most contracts with facilities. These contracts are not earned by offering the pinnacle of quality with the cheapest prices. In fact, it is quite the opposite. Facilities actively seek out which phone companies can provide them with the biggest kickbacks. These kickbacks take the form of percentages of revenue, as well as random expenses and technology.

Facilities are questioned for their business practices and how they choose phone companies. As an explanation, or excuse—whichever word you want to use—facilities say that they need the extra money for security and to be able to hire the proper personnel. They claim that the money goes into endeavors that make environments safer and more pleasant. Watch this video on Youtube.

People who question facilities and phone companies argue that it is wrong for facilities to demand kickbacks, and that this way of doing business is a scam. Also, people argue that phone companies such as Global Tel-Link can still make a profit if they charge significantly lower rates that are closer to rates of regular phone calls outside of prison and jail.

Know more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2014-12-17/serial-podcasts-2-500-phone-bill-and-the-prison-pay-phone-racket